MovieChat Forums > Marty (1955) Discussion > This is a great movie--why don't more pe...

This is a great movie--why don't more people know about it?


Really, it even won so many Academy Awards, you'd think more people would have at least heard of this movie. Admittedly, though, I only saw Marty because my mom found it at the library...

But it's such a sweet and touching film. There aren't many movies that show us what it's like the be the "loser," because, come on, who wants to see a movie about that? But it's those feelings of loneliness that I think people can most relate to. Plus it was done so honestly and fairly. Movies like this are rare.

My favorite part was when Marty's mom tries getting him to go out on Saturday night and to wear the blue (I think it was blue) suit, and he tells her that it doesn't matter if he wears the blue suit or the grey suit or whatever, because it will always turn out the same for him. I cried at that part.

--"The principles of surgery are the same above and below the neck."--

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I concur--great picture. Moving and well-written.

Oh, and I found it tucked away in the library, too.

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I dunno it wasnt praised as years went on...a pity because it is really, really good actually an excellent about rarely shown subjects.

My happiness is your hap-penis

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I, too, had not heard of this movie until recently. I wasn't sure what to expect going in, but I found the story to be very enjoyable. Being an almost middle-aged bachelor, I could certainly identify with the lead character(although I'm not sure I'm quite as noble ;-). However, the one thing that bothered me about this movie was that I felt it ended rather abruptly and left some unresolved conflicts. I mean, just when it was getting good and I was certain things were about to get more complicated, it ends! Frankly, I felt a bit jilted!

What about the relationship between Marty and his mom? Would she finally come to terms with the idea of Marty getting married? Would the girl really take Marty back after he ditched her for his gang? If so, why didn't we get to see a scene at the end with Marty and his girl back in each other's arms (or getting married)? What about the grocery store Marty wanted to open and the job that his girl was thinking about taking out of town? What about his brother's relationship with his wife? And, most importantly, what about some sort of come-uppance for the nagging aunt who turned Marty's mom against the idea of him getting married (after she had pleaded with Marty to go find a nice girl!)? I think they've could've added 30 more minutes to the film, and given us a little more satisfaction! =)

Just my two cents....

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Most haven't heard about it because most are stupid and short-sighted, and possibly lazy. This is a small gem that has sadly been overlooked, like hundreds of other movies.

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lately I go through the academy award archive which includes all the major nominations beginning from 20s. That's how I discovered Marty, which is currently on my watch list.

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I only know about it because we studied the screenplay in school. we had to write a conclusion...mine was, shall we say, different.

"It's not easy having a good time. Even smiling makes my face ache."

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I see what you mean, I felt the same way when I first saw it, but I think the point is that the Aunt and the mom and the friends and everything else going on in his life were not important enough for him to let go of this woman who he loved so completly.

As for his aunt's behavior being revenged I don't know how neccassary that is! I mean I think she was in the picture more for her lonely position's variation on the main theme than as a means of destroying Marty and Clara's relationship. Her unhappiness at growing old and, in her own mind useless, was what was causing her to speak the way she did to Marty's mother which in turn was what caused Marty's mother to speak the way she did to Marty. Marty's friends were the same way and for the same basic reason, they're own selfish fears.

Marty folds to the pressure he feels to please everyone, at first, but eventually sees what is most important. The last scene was saying that things would still be complicated, as in real life, but they'd still work out.

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The people in this movie are very ugly and are losers. This is America and we have no such time for losers like these people. Give me Jessica Alba, Scarlett Johansson, and Paul Walker, people with substance and true acting ability, as well as being beautiful inside and outside.

Hehehe F-u-n-n-y ... Yeah just what we all want to watch 'beautiful' people admiring themselves in the mirror.


Don't Make Me Have to Release the Flying Monkeys!


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Marty is not very well known cos it has been critised for winning Best Picture. thats why. they say that East of Eden (starring James Dean) should have won.

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This film was based on a television play by Paddy Chayefsky ("Playhouse 90" first broadcast that version). In it Rod Steiger played Marty and Nancy Marchand (later of "Lou Grant" and "The Sopranos") played Clara. Burt Lancaster and Harold Hecht got together to produce the film a couple of years later and cast Ernest Borgnine (who was known for playing villain roles, e.g. Fatso Judson in "From Here to Eternity" who so brutally attacks Frank Sinatra's character of Maggio. Betsy Blair (known at the time primarily for being Gene Kelly's wife) was cast as Clara. The film should receive more air time. It is hard to believe that it is fifty years old, having won Academy Awards for 1955.

The movie was easier to watch than the tv version (for me anyway) probably because of Borgnine. It is such a quiet film but speaks volumes about ordinary people who try to find the 'cover for the pot', and do endure jealousies of family and friends when a new person enters the social setting, or hurt at rejection.

I truly wonder given the Method actors who came along and the change of Hollywood dynamics, if the film was made today, how it would be received? Would it be too quiet to get Academy recognition? Borgnine won the Best Actor Oscar on his first and only nomination to date and Betsy Blair was nominated but lost in the Supporting Actress category.

I would still love to think that it would have gotten the much deserved kudos. Not every Academy award winning actor has to play a biographical, emotionally vocal ("This is my Oscar moment people, look at me") role, or be given a physical disability in order to achieve the invite to walk to the stage to receive the 'little golden guy'.

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Actually, the live television MARTY aired on a show called "Goodyear Playhouse" in May of 1953. "Playhouse 90" was still 3 years away from its debut, and remarkably, MARTY on television was less than an hour long!! Without the commercial breaks, it probably topped out at 49-50 minutes. Can you imagine all that drama written so tightly and resolved so quickly?

And, as others here have already mentioned, with MARTY the play was the thing. Its strength was its taut teleplay/screenplay by Chayefsky, and there simply isn't a lot of quiet, understated, script-driven storytelling in movies today. That's probably why more folks don't know about it-- or appreciate it.

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it's one of my top ten films of all time.

It deals with the lives of ordinary people with everyday problems,which may be why it is not better known today.Many people go to the movies to escape their everyday lives.

But I love this one,great acting by Ernest Borgnine and I recently met Betsy Blair at a signing of her book. Someone in the audience complimented her on her performance and she was given a big round of applause,she seemed geniuninely touched by that.I told her this was one of my favorites and she said"it IS a good movie,isn't it,and you know why? Because of the writing."

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AriesJB4 wrote:
"I truly wonder given the Method actors who came along and the change of Hollywood dynamics, if the film was made today, how it would be received? Would it be too quiet to get Academy recognition?"

There are indie films of a similar nature being made today -- low budget films that get very little recognition or box-office business. But Paddy Chyevski (sp) made this a film worth taking a close look at.

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I know I'm entering this string late in the day, but a quick correction: MARTY was first telecast on the PHILCO-GOODYEAR PLAYHOUSE, not Playhouse 90. It premiered on NBC on May 24, 1954 (a Sunday night).

Also, about the ending: there's a scene that was cut from most DVD and many VHS copies of the film version. The scene takes place in Clara's apartment right after her date with Marty. She tells her dad all about the evening and how wonderful Marty is; Mom is also told some of this. Finally, she states that she WILL take the job out of town.

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"they say that East of Eden (starring James Dean) should have won"

This was one of the rare times they voted right. Marty is a superior movie to the bloated East of Eden, and Borgnine is an infinitely better actor than the ultimate ham, Dean (sorry he died young, but that doesn't make him great).

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I don't think people watch black and white movies anymore. Being more than 50 years old, some aspects are dated. However, many more are universal and timeless.

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I love it. I wonder who they could use if they remade it - maybe John Turturro? This was such a sweet side of Borgnine - and vulnerable. I thought of Turturro - his character in "Quiz Show" is supposed to throw the game on a question about "Marty" and he goes on about how he loves the movie.

This movie is indeed a classic.

"...truth against the world..."

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This being IMDb, I totally expect to be ridiculed for this; however, I think The Tao of Steve comes close for capturing a bit of this type of story, yet was made not that long ago. The main characters are very different--Marty not being as flashy personality-wise--but I think The Tao of Steve shows that even though it took and indie film to do it and it came nowhere close to getting and Oscar, a simple story regarding romantic love can still resonate today. Both are very clever movies, as well. I'm not sure people always get how funny Paddy's writing could be.

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