MovieChat Forums > Love Me or Leave Me (1955) Discussion > Doris Didn't Get Oscar Nomination Becaus...

Doris Didn't Get Oscar Nomination Because


Two other women, Eleanor Parker and Susan Hayward were nominated that year for playing famous singers with problems. Anna Magnani wound up winning for "Rose Tattoo".

Ironically, unlike Hayward & Parker, Doris Day was the only one of the three that did her own singing.

Doris Day was robbed.

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I agree that Day was robbed in not getting a nomination. She gives what is probably the very best performance of her career playing Ruth Etting opposite an equally brilliant Jimmy Cagney as Moe 'the Gimp.'

I've never seen the Parker film, but I own both I'll Cry Tomorrow and The Rose Tattoo. If I had to vote between Day, Magnani and Hayward - even though they are all brilliant - I think I'd vote for Susan Hayward, who, I believe, does actually sing in the film and is not dubbed.

We're all busy little bees, aren't we, honey?

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You're right about Hayward doing her own singing in I'll Cry Tomorrow. Though she'd played other singers before (Smash-Up: The Story of a Woman, With A Song In My Heart) she never did her own singing till that film.

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Both "Interrupted Melody" and "Love Me or Leave Me" were MGM releases. Maybe word went out from MGM that its people should vote for Eleanor Parker rather than Doris Day in the Oscar balloting. Don't know if this is true and, if so, don't know why MGM would favor Parker over Day. Theories?

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"I'll Cry Tomorrow" was also an MGM release so MGM had several actresses among whom it could divide its Oscar attention.

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Doris was a nice light actress, very likeable and talented in a Debbie Reynolds sort of way, but oscar winner for acting?? don't think so. Susan Hayward was in another league

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10/18/14 7:47p Love Me Or Leave Me Doris Day 1955
theduchess86: Doris Day has a Body of Film Work that encompasses Comedy, Music and Drama and for that she is second to none in her Film career.

ellisisle

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theduchess86,

While I adore the fun and happy films that Doris Day made with Rock Hudson and James Garner, I agree 100% with you. I wonder if those so impressed with her performance in this film have spent much time watching those other films? When Ruth is raped by Martin (although the Hayes Code people took out most of the footage), Doris uses the exact SAME squeak and huffy "well, how dare you!" response that she used in the comedies--when, for example, Rock Hudson pulls her out of bed to carry her off over his shoulder to marry him in Pillow Talk (after she redecorates his bachelor pad in fitting fashion to seduce women with automatic bed, bar, and mood lighting). Even in telephone exchanges, she uses the same level of emotion in that movie as she does as Ruth having been raped by the man who has been helping her career. I'd expect the rape to be far more traumatic?

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