Prologue Orchestra SO ANNOYING!




That orchestra in the beginning starts out good, but then gets SO ANNOYING.

It seriously starts to sound like a bad horror movie after a while and you want it to end.

Also, that "New York" song in the opening is lousy too.

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[deleted]

Well, I found it very annoyung too. After trying to fast forward and the damn thing didn't end, I just skipped that part. :)

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[deleted]

Oh, but we can appreciate music, but there's a time and a place for everything. Here it has absolutely no function. If I want to hear a classical performance I go to a concert.


--
Rome. By all means, Rome.

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totally Steven, you said it best. I was getting into it and was actually angry by the time the movie started. Not a good mood to have people in.

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I agree it is a great piece of music beautifully performed - but what connection did it have to the movie? Why didn't they just play this as the openning credits were being shown?

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I think the film makers wanted to wow the audience with the Cinemascope. I agree that it's out of place.

"What do you want me to do, draw a picture? Spell it out!"

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I think the film makers wanted to wow the audience with the Cinemascope. I agree that it's out of place.
That's exactly it. HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE was only the second film released in Cinemascope and it's there to show off the format. This movie is often used as an example of the need for letterboxing movies for television but in my opinion the film is an example of Cinemascope at it's worse for making the sets far wider than they should be. The infamous Lauren Bacall/William Powell scene at the restaurant; it's used by the pro-letterbox crowd to show you have to have the letterbox format to see them both, to me it's a glaring example of it's a great example of how ridiculous some directors set up scenes for Cinemascope - Bacall is so far away from William Powell you would think he has body odor or something.

I think it would be a nice touch if the DVD would allow you to watch the movie with or WITHOUT the prologue - of course you can always jump the chapter but it's flow much more smoothly without the prologue if if you don't want to sit through it.

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[deleted]

I think it's odd that the trailer on the DVD is in BLACK AND WHITE, and makes no mention of Technicolor!! They really push the new format, without just...at least casually...mentioning the Technicolor.

But yeah, the music bit is an oblique way to start the film.


Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally

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[deleted]

WRONG! The OVERTURE was used in MANY motion pictures. I believe the last one to use it was 2001: A Space Odyssey

And I liked it and found it fascinating.

Those who find it annoying can always recover their six minutes of wasted lifetime by turning on the tube and watching Dancing with the Stars.

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[deleted]

Oh for crying out loud....

I love pre-1970 films and I don't watch modern television at all. I still say that this overture wasn't needed. In fact, many pre-1970 films did NOT have overtures...

~~
JimHutton (1934-79) and ElleryQueen

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I don't see how it showed off the format it is static and confined to a set - music behind sweeping panoramic views of new york city would have showed off the format more impressively

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Each time I watch this film, I just skip the overture.

~~
JimHutton (1934-79) and ElleryQueen

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Bacall is so far away from William Powell you would think he has body odor or something


Are you talking about this shot ?

http://i.imgur.com/m8CnwXV.jpg

Seems like a totally normal distance between two persons in a restaurant.

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It may be a "normal distance" in an actual restaurant but it's far from the normal sitting in a restaurant for a film - only on widescreen can you fully see both of them, when this is aired without letterbox on television one of them is usually half (or completely) cropped off.

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I completly agree, I prepared to watch this movie on tv for the first time. After 2 minutes of that, I got pissed off and changed the channel until it was over. It was way too *beep* long and had nothing to do with the film, wtf?

Paul Avery: Someone should write a *beep* book, that's for sure.

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I thought it was interesting. It also gave me time to make my coffee before the actual story began. :)

"A labyrinthine man never seeks the truth, but only his Ariadne."

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[deleted]

It seems pretty pointless to me and didn't have anything to do with the film, but I think the prologue was in place so the audience would take their seats.

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Zipped right through with DVR.

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Yea, I skipped it.

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Totally appropriate given the time the film came out. Big Hollywood films often had an overture, and as others have mentioned Fox wanted to show off their pride and joy "Cinemascope".

I actually enjoy the opening number. It helps get me in the frame of mind of the audience from that era. I also thought the "New York" song after the credits was also great.

Its just a different era. I'm sure the audience from that era would most of movies made after the mid 1960s.

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didn't understand your last sentence - however I saw the film in the theatre when it was first released and I was baffled by the openning overture - I don't remember any similar overtures to movies - can you help me

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[deleted]

There's a great list in WiKi for films of the golden age and beyond that have overtures. I remember them in biblical epics, but it spans a lot of genres.

If we can save humanity, we become the caretakers of the world

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The clods who protest the overture are ignorant that Street Scene was written for the film of the same name, and has become - with its Gershwinesque flavor - symbolic of New York. Moreover, it is conducted by none other than Alfred Newman, the original composer himself.

To see Newman in action is a rare privilege indeed, but born-yesterday knuckle-draggers don't know or care, of course beyond a misapprehension about Alfred E. Neuman of MAD Magazine.

The overture is completely appropriate for this film, with its elegant New York setting, as well as for its format in a "big studio" release - many of which had overtures. The exception here is that, in those other films, we do not get to see the composer at all.

People need to grow up, get some education - and if they still can't stand this unique film overture - just FF through it. If the DVD doesn't permit that, then they can just turn down the sound. Sheesh.

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I am perfectly aware that Street Scene was written for a much earlier movie. In fact, I've heard parts of Street Scene played in other films. For example, a few notes of it were played during the opening credits of the 1950 film Where the Sidewalk Ends.

I watch a lot of pre-1970 films and most of them don't have overtures. I say that they aren't needed, and each time I watch this film, I skip over the overture.

I don't need to grow up and I don't need to "get some education". It's only a movie, not the real world. My appreciation (or lack thereof) of the overture has absolutely nothing to do with my maturity and education levels, thanks.

~~
JimHutton (1934-79) and ElleryQueen

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West Side Story has a stunning on-camera overture (often cut out of early TV broadcasts, but happily returned to home video DVD and of course on TCM). Other overtures (which may have been expanded for their DVD's) include Gone With the Wind, How the West was Won, Ben-Hur, and It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World.

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