MovieChat Forums > Scaramouche (1952) Discussion > Leigh over Parker??? NEVER!!!

Leigh over Parker??? NEVER!!!


I love Janet Leigh but any guy that prefers her to Eleanor (homina-homina) Parker is a fool. Totally unbelieveable. Bad choice Stewart, bad choice.

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Totally agree. I got to the end and went, "What? But Parker is sooooo much sexier! I'm a straight woman and I know this is no contest!" I didn't say that outloud, of course. My parents were in the room.

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Would've been more awkward had you said "I'm a gay woman and I know this is no contest"... outloud with your parents in the room ;)

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Damn, I'm watching it now. In this movie, Parker is ten times sexier.

So, to sum it up in legal terminology: Get lost, you bum.

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I felt the same way over Lana Turner vs Anne Dvorak in that moovie where they are NY Models and Anne Dvorak jumps from her 16th story apartment. (Anne Dvorak was always jumping out of stuff, and/or getting shot)

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Glad I'm not the only one who feels this way. Not that Janet Leigh wouldn't be the better choice in most cases, but its stretches credibility that Granger's character would choose hers over Parker's.

"You may very well think that; I couldn't possibly comment."

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Well, I liked Janet Leigh so although that goes against the grain and according to the O.P. makes me a fool, in theory I wouldn't have had any competition...(dream).

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It was quite a shock when Andre when for Aline over Lenore only because he realised she was not related to him. It did not feel right with the rest of the narrative considering the chemistry Andre had with Lenore. I think the scriptwriters should have kept Aline as his sister as through out Scaramouche it had made for great drama on part of the audience, knowing something only Andre knew which made for intriguing viewing only for this aspect to be redundant by the end felt like a waste.

"I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not".

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They probably forced the ending because they ended up together in the book (where André said he felt like her big brother though they never were nor thought they were siblings).

The movie was fun but some of the things they changed from the novel, like the entire political climate, the riots in Paris, Lenore and André separating midway through the story, etc., kind of weakened everything. While I enjoyed it I would love to see this story filmed again with a more faithful adaptation in mind.

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The Hollywood Production Code and 50s sexual morality dictated that female audience goers must never be allowed to assume that you could have unmarried sex AND end up married to the man of your dreams. All self-respecting 'men of your dreams' were only allowed to marry virgins.

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Yes, I'm surprised that it took so long until "boirin" brought it up. It's because it was made in 1952. The hero would HAVE to end up with the sweet virginal girl, not the much hotter woman who is in a travelling theater troupe and probably has been around. Though in every other way, she was the real match for him. I'm amazed they got away with that rocking wagon bit when they were having that "fight".

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In that case, their roles should have been reversed.

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I agree, and I'll go one further: I'd have taken Parker over Julie Andrews thirteen years later in "The Sound of Music". In that red dress she wore in her final scene--talk about "homina-homina"!

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