MovieChat Forums > The Flavor of Green Tea Over RiceĀ (1952) Discussion > The title is misconstrued by most Englis...

The title is misconstrued by most English speakers


The title as rendered in English, "The taste of green tea over rice" has an epicurean, airy-fairy connotation completely opposite to that of the Japanese phrase. At the end of the film we realize that ochazuke is down-home soul food that reminds the couple of their early days of happy penury. The feeling of the title would better be conveyed in English as something like "The taste of oatmeal" or "The taste of grits."

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You are correct-o-mundo sir.

"The Taste of Flake-Like-Toppings on Rice" might not be very well-received...

"The Taste of Gravy" anyone?

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Thanks for the clarification! So much is inevitably lost in linguistic and cultural translation.

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Actually all that was lost on me, an English English speaker. To us oatmeal is an ingredient, not something to be eaten on its own; and grit is what you throw on the road in snowy weather. So there's another cultural misconstruction.

The flavour of bread-and-butter?

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Hey, Bobokitty, that's really strange; the last post on this thread was more than two years ago, then you and I posted within hours of each other.

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Not really. The airy fairy connotation you mention is presumably the status of green tea as a sort of delicacy in modern Western culture, which arguably is, but the meaning is made perfectly obvious upon watching the film. I haven't noticed this misreading.

~.~
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