Question (SPOILER)


Just wondering about something...

SPOILER





Is this the first movie to depict (or even refer to) a female police officer being killed in the line of duty? Seems like that might make an interesting historical footnote if it is.

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I see no one has responded yet Erich. Actually it is a very good question. I have seen lots of movies but haven't heard of any. I will keep an eye out on others.

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was anybody else disturbed by the way marie windsor's character was just dropped? nobody even cared that she had died doing her job, and especially after all the fuss made about the officer that died at the beginning. and she was ten times more interesting than that annoying blonde..

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Yeah, It annoyed me too that once she is killed, no one cares. She's never mentioned again...not even to say that they found the body! Sheesh!

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[deleted]

Yes, it bothered me very much, as I state in my own review of this film. Even though I couldn't understand why her door wasn't locked and her gun not readily accessible. Gunned down, stuffed in a mattress like garbage and just as forgotten as yesterdays trash. It actually made me quite angry. I couldn't believe that the woman who turned out to be the real "Mrs Neill" was as naive about her husband's activities as she made out. And that a tough cop like Mcgraw would so readily lap it up. If she really was a decent person you would expect some sort of an emotional reaction; knowing that someone else took bullets intended for her, even if this possibility was in the job description. I don't usually get emotional enough to "talk at" movies, but I felt like "telling" that smug blonde that maybe the woman who died for her was someone's daughter, wife or mother. It was interesting to note that her police ID found by the killers gave her division as the Parks Department. Back then, the only assignments for policewomen other than running lost children centers or searching female arrestees was as rape and purse-snatching decoys, usually in parks.

I do recall reading somewhere that about 20 minutes was cut from this film. Footage which actually did depict the characters reacting emotionally to her death. And, most interestingly showing that McGraw's murdered partner was in fact on the take. I wonder if this is true. The film (great as it is) would certainly make more sense from this perspective. If so, I 'd love to see the complete story.

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Yes Yes, I agree about nothing being made of her being shot. I just posted that statement before. I just saw the movie on TCM today and I only saw it once before. I kept thinking maybe they cut out something because I couldn't believe they wouldn't show someone checking the body to see if she was still breathing, for God's sake. This spoiled the movie for me because Marie Windsor was one of my favorites actresses.

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Maybe not checking the body is supposed to lead us to believe she's very obviously dead. This is a post-Code movie and I'm just assuming they were being really careful about gore... notice how people in these movies always get shot where the bullet holes won't show.



Last seen:
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I realize that gore went out of style in the 30s and wasn't re-invented till the 60s. But I still find it surprising that no one took their hats off and bemoaned her death,and/or saluted her bravery, especially since she turned out to be one of the Good Guys. Like the author of one of the previous replies, I am also a serious Marie Windsor fan. Most of her numerous screen deaths didn't really bother me much since she often played despicable characters. However, the dismissive manner in which her death was treated in this film really upset me and caused me to feel great sympathy for her----at first,not so much for the actress, but for her character. After all, she was working in Internal Affairs, and many cops hate those who police them at least as much as they do criminals. Even Barney Miller shared this attitude.

Upon reflection I felt the same anguish for Windsor as well. Because the way her character was treated in the film was so emblematic of the way this fine actress was treated by a Hollywood establishment that never appreciated her ability or properly recognized her accomplishments.

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Absolutely. I glad to see you noticed this also. Sam Spade's partner was a heel and he still felt a duty to him so it's inconceivable that this policewoman would be tossed aside without a thought - particullary since it was Brown's incompetence that got her killed (why was he with the blonde instead of protecting his charge?)

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It wasn't a long movie. It seems like they could have added a few seconds where they find out that Marie is killed and show some sorrow if only for a few seconds.

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(why was he with the blonde instead of protecting his charge?)

I'm guessing it was because Windsor's character was a bit too good at playing the role of "obnoxious gangster's widow."

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I believe that this was released as a 2nd feature and therefore was trimmed by the studios as most "B" movies had little over 60 min. running times. Therefore, scenes which would have shown more sympathy for Marie Windsor's murder were probably cut.

I'm the kind of guy, when I move - watch my smoke. But I'm gonna need some good clothes though.

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I agree that probably occurred, but it was rather odd to do that, considering the big deal that Brown made (and very justifiable it should be added) of Forbes's sacrifice. Then when it is revealed Mrs Neal suffers a similar fate, he appears completely disinterested, rather preferring to revel in his budding friendship with Anne Sinclair.

The twist involving Mrs Neal was unexpected, but not well executed IMO (pardon the pun).

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A lot of people keep raising this same issue but I don't understand why. What did you expect would happen? I can't imagine any scene involving him reacting to her death that would make any sense.

Once it turns out she's not the real Mrs. Neale, she doesn't matter in the context of the story. As much as he cared for his friend and partner, he had to basically step over his body and continue on with the assignment. That's just as true in her case. He had to get the real Mrs. Neal to the Grand Jury. That's just how it is.

Also, as much as he disliked the fake Mrs. Neale, it would have been completely out of character and disingenuous for him to have had any sort of emotional reaction. Finding out she was a cop wouldn't have made a difference. She was not only investigating him but actively trying to entice him to stray. If he was ever tempted to take the money it would have been because she was such a total pain.

Let's not forget, Brown was also smitten with Mrs. Sinclair. It may sound cold but he was distracted. The fact she turned out to be the actual 'package' he had to deliver made it that much better.


Woman, man! That's the way it should be Tarzan. [Tarzan and his mate]

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This really hurt this movie. One has to assume that the original version, assuming this is not the only one, did show this missing scene. As it is, this hole should bring it's rating down from 7.9 to say 7.0 A major flaw indeed--when the second, or some wd say first, leading role in the film is just vanished (really gotta believe this is a cut version or the original, because the movie is otherwise way to smart to make such a stupid error)

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Anyone who feels this way should share their thoughts on what they think would have been an appropriate scene to include in the movie following the lady cop's death. I honestly cannot imagine one but that's because I don't think one was needed.


Woman, man! That's the way it should be Tarzan. [Tarzan and his mate]

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Brown's lack of evident emotion to Miggs' death (or from his perspective, sudden disappearance) is not surprising, as he just learned her job was to trip him up and call him out for taking a bribe. Her "gravy train" spiel is out-and-out entrapment, and would have foiled any conviction if entered into evidence.

The qualm is that the film treats her death as lightly as it does. It was no doubt lost in the editing, with input from Howard Hughes. I almost think it adds a layer of resonance for us as viewers, seeing a police officer's ultimate sacrifice taken so for granted - even by other cops. She could have told the crooks who she really was, but she was true to her badge to the point of death, and no one knows it in the end except us.

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