MovieChat Forums > The Narrow MarginĀ (1952) Discussion > If I liked this movie, what else would I...

If I liked this movie, what else would I like?


I love the whole notion of noir, and in particular loved the quick pace of this movie, the train setting, and the touches of humor. I've seen The Big Sleep, Notorious, Maltese Falcon, The Third Man, Strangers on a Train, and maybe a couple of other requisite noirs I'm forgetting.

I'm currently watching Out of the Past on YouTube, although it's a bit sluggish so far.

I listened to Friedkin's DVD commentary, and he ran off a list of other notable film noirs I hadn't seen, but the titles were hard to remember, given the usual vagueness of the genre's titles. So can anyone recommend any of those or other must-see examples? Thanks.

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I bought 3 films from Movie Mail which I really enjoyed-- I think they have a noir section.
The Big Heat 1953 Glenn Ford ,Gloria Graham, Lee Marvin.

The Naked City 1948 Barry Fitzgerald, Howard Duff,Dorothy Hart.Winner of 2AAs. Directed by Jules Dassin

Where The Sidewalk Ends 1950 Dana Andrews,Gene Tierney,Karl Malden.

Try and get hold of Robert Mitchum films from the 40s --these are very noirish.

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THE ASPHALT JUNGLE, THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE, VIOLENT SATURDAY (in color but essentially a Noir type film, CHINATOWN, FAREWELL MY LOVELY (1975 with R. Mitchum), HIGH SIERRA, SECOND CHANCE (Mitchum again), THEY LIVE BY NIGHT, KISS ME DEADLY (1955), MURDER MY SWEET.

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I'm surprised you're finding Out of the Past sluggish. I think it's arguably one of the top three or four examples of noir. TCM's Robert Osborne has pointed out that it is one of those rare films in which every actor's performance is just perfect.

I think you might like Double Indemnity, starring Fred MacMurray, Edward G. Robinson and Barbara Stanwyck.

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I'm surprised you're finding Out of the Past sluggish. I think it's arguably one of the top three or four examples of noir. - pt100

Agree on both counts. Out of the Past is on my short list of "big" noirs, by which I mean they are, or could be, A-list pictures (also on the list are Double Indemnity and The Maltese Falcon, to pick just two), and if you don't pay attention to what is going on, you'll miss a number of the many nuances.

Among the "little" noirs are, no surprise here, The Narrow Margin and Detour, again just to pick two.

And bouncing between those two lists is The Asphalt Jungle, which arguably contains the quintessence of noir. With the cast and director (John Huston), it seems like an A-lister, but because it inhabits the gritty margins of society so wonderfully, it has the feel of a "little" noir like He Walked by Night.

"Big" or "little," though, when it's good, it's great. Like The Narrow Margin. I don't think there is a moment wasted here.
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"We hear very little, and we understand even less." - Refugee in Casablanca

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I agree with your analysis. Did you know that The Maltese Falcon (in which Walter Huston did a cameo) was John Huston's directorial debut? Not bad for a first picture.

It is better to be kind than to be clever or good looking. -- Derek

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Did you know that The Maltese Falcon (in which Walter Huston did a cameo) was John Huston's directorial debut? - pt100

I did know that Falcon was John's directorial debut and, yes, not a bad way to start. However, I did not know that his father makes a cameo. Where does he appear?

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"We hear very little, and we understand even less." - Refugee in Casablanca

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He's the guy who staggers, clutching the falcon wrapped in newspaper, into Sam Spade's office and then collapses and dies after muttering, "You know, the falcon".

It is better to be kind than to be clever or good looking. -- Derek

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He's the guy who staggers, clutching the falcon wrapped in newspaper, into Sam Spade's office and then collapses and dies after muttering, "You know, the falcon".

Ay yi yi! So obvious and yet I've never noticed it before. I'll have to look for him the next time I watch the film. Thanks!

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"We hear very little, and we understand even less." - Refugee in Casablanca

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Although, technically, it was a speaking part, Walter did not receive any remuneration for the part, nor any screen credit.

It is better to be kind than to be clever or good looking. -- Derek

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TCM is showing it again this Sunday evening, 8/24/14, at 5 p.m. PDT. Check your local listings if you're in a different time zone.

It is better to be kind than to be clever or good looking. -- Derek

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More must-see noirs: This Gun For Hire (1942), Casablanca (1943), Double Indemnity (1944), Murder My Sweet (1945), The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Killers and The Stranger (all 1946), Key Largo and Force of Evil (1948), Act of Violence and House of Strangers (both 1949), Human Desire (1954), Touch of Evil (1958)

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More must-see noirs: This Gun For Hire (1942), Casablanca (1943), - deforest-1

This is fine list, but I wouldn't include Casablanca as a film noir. It's a romantic melodrama--and Ilsa is hardly a femme fatale--set against the backdrop of a war, and its tone, both thematically and visually, is too "bright" to be considered a noir. In the end, Rick makes the right moral choice (on at least two counts). If there are crimes committed here, they must be considered within the much broader context of the Axis powers starting a world war. Again, this is a wartime romantic melodrama whose morality is anything but ambiguous. Not a noir.

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"We hear very little, and we understand even less." - Refugee in Casablanca

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Old thread, but for anyone else interested I'd say these have a similar feel:

Pickup on South St.
Naked City
Fourteen Hours
Kiss of Death
Born to Kill
Raw Deal
Where the Sidewalk Ends
Lady on a Train
Cry of the City

~.~
There were three of us in this marriage
http://www.imdb.com/list/ze4EduNaQ-s/

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Two which come to mind are "Where the Sidewalk Ends" and "I Wake up Screaming". The latter is not a horror film despite the title.

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The Tall Target directed by Anthony Mann.

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silver streak.

r pryor, g wilder.


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