Scene 16


What's the story behind the deletion of this scene, which was added to the dvd?
Why exactly was it removed?
I would appreciate any replies.

I think I must have one of those faces you can't help believing.

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I can only assume that the callous treatment of the poor and ill offended some level of government. I don't understand why, because it wasn't a contemporary drama, but depicted an historical fact.

I'm puzzled by scene 16's deletion as well, and hope someone has further information.




You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be lead.

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[deleted]

Contrary to an earlier post, the deleted scene was NOT set in a commune; the setting was a Skid Row flophouse where indigents could rent a filthy chicken wire cell and cot for the night. Although it's hard to believe, operations like this were still in business for at least another fifty years after story took place. In fact, it was in a flophouse much like this one (Chicago's Starr Hotel) where mass murderer Richard Speck was arrested after killing a number of student nurses in 1966.

Still, that doesn't explain why the scene was cut, either.

While preparing the DVD, Paramount may simply have unearthed a scene that originally had been deleted for some commercial (length?) or artistic consideration (could be that preview audiences were as baffled by this largely unknown environment as modern viewers and mistakenly assumed he'd been imprisoned in some kind of interment camp) and studio just decided to include it on DVD as a bonus. In any event, there's certainly nothing inherently offensive about it, as the explanation at beginning of disc implies. A mystery.

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In 1951 I am sure that both American and particularly British audiences were aware of the existence of 'doss houses' which this clearly is. Why would it be an internment camp? It was in the McCarthy era and they probably thought it was socialist to show ill treatment of the poor even in a period setting. Although Olivier gave a brilliant performance I found the film too depressing and can't say I enjoyed it.

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The scene was cut simply because it was considered too politically incorrect, as they say. If you think of how polite/sensitive/careful the way of portraying issues like adultery (Carrie) or premarital affairs (The Appartment) or lesbianism (Children's Hour) was in the films of that era, you'll realize that such a scene was excessive realism, and would have offended some viewers.

Since the scene wasn't essential for the story, I believe the studio may have cut the scene by themselves.
I'm glad it was added to the dvd-version.

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I saw this movie when it was broadcast on NBC in the 60's and the flophouse scene was there. If the scene was too "hot" for theater audiences in 1952, it would have been the same or even more so for a family viewing it at home in the 60's.
It was probably cut out of the circulation print because it wasn't essential to the story.

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I know I read somewhere that the scene was deleted because the studio felt it was too depressing.

Plus, I doubt many people would buy the the idea of Sir Laurence Olivier ending up in a flophouse.

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