MovieChat Forums > Jane Eyre (1944) Discussion > Jane Eyre reminds me of Rebecca(1940)

Jane Eyre reminds me of Rebecca(1940)


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032976/plotsummary

Plot Summary for
Rebecca (1940)

A shy ladies companion is staying in Monte Carlo with her stuffy employer when she meets the wealthy Maxim de Winter. Max is still troubled by the death of his wife, Rebecca in a boating accident the year before. She and Max fall in love, get married and return to Manderlay, his large country estate in Cornwall. The second Mrs. de Winter meets the housekeeper Mrs. Danvers and discovers that Rebecca still has a strange hold on everyone at Manderlay.

Summary written by Col Needham {[email protected]}

Maxim de Winter, still troubled by the death of his wife Rebecca, falls in love with a shy ladies' companion. They get married, but Lady de Winter discovers that Rebecca still has a big hold on everyone in the house, particularly on Mrs. Denvers, the housekeeper, who begins driving the young wife to madness.

Summary written by Claudio Sandrini {[email protected]}

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Daphne Du Maurier, the 20th century writer who wrote Rebecca, was a big fan of the Brontes. She even wrote a biography about Branwell Bronte. Jane Eyre was written about 100 years before Rebecca.

Rebecca is very very similar to Jane Eyre, and in my opinion is basically a re-make of it, although that's still being debated today!

Hope that claifies it!

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The novel 'Rebecca' is loosely based on 'Jane Eyre', d I wouldn't be suprise dif Jane Eyre was Daphne du Maurier;s favourite book. I love both of them, but I wouldn't like to have to choose between iether of them as I love them both so much. While they are very similar in plot and settings and characters, they are both very different in loads of other ways. Laurence Oliver would have made a good Mr Rochester.

Derek

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The basic plot of the stories are very similar, but rebecca has a lot more mystery about it, the fact that a woman is locked in that room, is made clear fairly early in jane eyre, but we are really left wondering the truth about rebecca until he comes out with the whole story late in the movie

"So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb." -Dark Helmet

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Yes that makes sense.

Derek

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Just thought that I'd add that apart from the comparisons between the two stories, this film version of Jane Eyre also reminds me of the 1940 film of Rebecca, not only for Joan Fontaine's presence but also because I think that similar devices were used (ie the gothic imagery, black and white, swirling mists and winding staircases kind of thing). And I think that in both instances these were very effective, though I slightly prefer Jane Eyre and think thatthe book definitely provided some inspiration for duMaurier when she wrote Rebecca.

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I haven't seen Jane Eyre in years, but I just saw Rebecca last night, and I am wondering if the house they used for Manderley in Rebecca was also the house used in Jane Eyre. Anybody know?


Ah, the rapier wit of an armless D'Artagnan.

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I think that Jane Eyre has much more personality as a heroine. In Rebbeca the
main heroine doesn't even have a name. Rebbeca is the name of the previous
wife and the central heroine who narrates the story doesn't much participate
but is being led by others. She hasn't that strong will or self respect Jane
has. And of course the poetic language of Bronte can not be competed.

"I can be on my guard against my enemies but God deliver me from my friends" - Charlotte Bronte

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Not only that but in Wuthering Heights written by Emily Bronte, Cathy when she was dying says:
"I dreamt I was back at Wuthering Heights."

I liked Rebecca a lot, but I would LOVE it if someone came up with some new material.

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[deleted]

I was thinking the same thing, but movies are similar



When there's no more room in hell, The dead will walk the earth...

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I think "Dragonwyck" (1946) is also similar to both "Jane Eyre" and "Rebecca".

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Good point, but I would say "Dragonwyck" and "Jane Eyre" are closer to one another than either is to "Rebecca."

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Yes, I believe that Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre inspired Daphne Du Maurier to write Rebecca. I also believe that The Uninvited (1944) was inspired by Hitchcock's Rebecca (1940). The Uninvited was based on the Dorothy Macardle novel Uneasy Freehold.

I would like to compare the characters, which also include a house! If you have not seen The Uninvited yet, please stop here because there are spoilers ahead which would ruin the mystery of The Uninvited. The Uninvited is more like a sequel to Jane Eyre or Rebecca where the first wife tries to kill the child of the second "wife".

Thornfield Hall = Manderlay = Windward House: Each are dangerous houses. Both Thornfield and Manderlay burn down and had some disturbed people in them. Windward House has a malevolent ghost. The last two houses are by the ocean.

Bertha's locked room in attic = Rebecca's room = artist's studio: Each room is either inhabited by a crazy woman or a malevolent ghost.

Bertha Mason = Rebecca = Mary Beech Meredith: All of the first wives were evil and psychologically disturbed.

Edward Rochester = Maxim de Winter = Mr. Meredith: These are all flawed men who came to hate their first wives.

Jane Eyre = "the second Mrs. de Winter" = Carmel: OK, that's stretching it a bit because Carmel never married Mr. Meredith although they did have a child out of wedlock.

? = Mrs. Danvers = Miss Holloway: There is no equivalent character from Jane Eyre because an obsessed lesbian relationship is implied with the first wives.

Monsters from the Id

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I believe the novel Rebecca was inspired by Jane Eyre, so that may be why you see similarities.

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The very reason Selznick decided not to make Jane Eyre and sold the rights to Fox is because of the similarities.

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Me too, except in my case, Rebecca reminded me of Jane Eyre. I came across the novel Rebecca recently and started reading it. For some reason I imagined Rebecca as Joan Fontaine(correct) and Maxim as Orson Welles (wrong). I was surprised when I checked IMDb to see that Maxim was played by Lawrence Olivier. Later, I learned that the movie I was thinking of, which I must have seen on TV years ago, was not Rebecca, but Jane Eyre!

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Irrespective of all the riff-raff on this thread I'll only say that, regardless of why story came first, "Rebecca" is superior in casting, directing, and story line. I say it's easily one of Hitchcock's best films; and I'm not someone who beats off to Hitchcock. "Rebecca" is spookier and more intriguing from the get-go than "Jane Eyre." I found "Jane Eyre" rather boring actually. "Rebecca" I could watch over and over again; and that's why I give "Rebecca" a 10/10 and I reluctantly give "Jane Eyre" 7/10, since I have little desire to see it again. Maybe it's because I'm not too fond of Welles.

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