MovieChat Forums > All Through the Night (1942) Discussion > Oh, so much fun! Your favourite bits?

Oh, so much fun! Your favourite bits?


I loved this movie! It's quite the romp. I had tears of mirth rolling down my face when Humphrey Bogart and his pal are trying to pass themselves off as Nazis..."And we will WIN! HEIL!" ahhh...never thought I'd see the day when Bogey stands up and heils, but when it happened I pretty much hit the floor. Also, gotta love the evil German mastermind and his evil pet Dachshund, Hansel. There were possibly a zillion other Rather Hilarious bits as well, but I'm too lazy to put them down.

~SPOON: We ain't no forks!~

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I love that Peter Lorre hums that German children's song (the name of which escapes me right now) when he is about to do something sinister. It is the most hilarious homage to M, where his character whistles when he is stalking his next victim.

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I didn't catch that! I just watched it for the 1st time - I thought it was great!

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I noticed Peter Lorre's little melody, too - We used to sing these lyrics to it when I was a kid:

Autumn leaves are now falling, red yellow and brown
Autum leaves are now falling, see them tumbling down

I was taught the song buy Polish-american nuns in Catholic school. My mom, who was born in Poland, told me the melody was Polish (and knew the Polish lyrics). Of course, she was from a region that was close to the German border, and the entire area was once part of the Austro-Hungarian empire, so who knows where the melody originated. The only references to it I can find online list it as a traditional children's song written by that famous composer "Anonymous.

I enjoyed the fact that some of the German-Americans (i.e., the Millers) were portrayed as sympathetic.

My DH and I just watched the movie yesterday. I mentioned that the cast reminded me of Damon Runyon characters, and he didn't know what that meant. I had to explain by using the example of Guys and Dolls, which he did the lighting for in his high school production.

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Love the scene at the auction, of which the Nazi saboteurs are using as a front. The scene where Donahue and his right hand man Sunshine (William Demarest) sneak into one of the rooms, where the saboteur’s true motivations come forward is quite brilliant.

Another scene that made me smile was one where Donahue has called the police from a hotel room, so that he can explain the whole story. (Donahue has been wrongly accused of murder himself, so he is being sought by the police) However, its some one else that shows up first, this being… who else but the Nazi saboteurs. “Your like a bad penny!” Bogie tells us!

However, the scene of the film for me is the one where Sunshine (William Demarest) and Donahue have infiltrated the Nazi’s group meeting and it is their turns to report. Demarest goes into this whole hilarious speech full of nonsense ‘mit line block oom da agar….” and at the end, he goes. “Heil!”

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If Bogie had been eating Miller's cheesecake three times a day for ten years, then how many times a day was the Jackie Gleason character eating it?

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If Bogie had been eating Miller's cheesecake three times a day for ten years, then how many times a day was the Jackie Gleason character eating it?

To the MOON beavo, to the moon

I hate to think what their blood reading was.

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When Demarest sees the portrait of Hitler and says, "Hey - Schicklegruber the housepainter!" Great inside put-down on Der Fuhrer.

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Don't forget the next line. "The face is familiar, but I don't know where to put it."

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"There's more here than the F.B.I.!" And that it had its release just days before Pearl harbor!

"Great theater makes you smile. Outstanding theater may make you weep."

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[deleted]

watched it again last night and could not agree more..

Was this before or after Maltese Falcon?

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Definitely after the Falcon, and I believe it was after Casablanca. Bogart is kind of sending up the characters that had transformed him from prominent character actor to leading man.

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It was before CASABLANCA.

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Jackie Gleason (or was it Barton MacLane) to vanquished Nazi thug: "Say it! Say God bless America!"

cinefreak

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Watched it (again) last night and the one bit of shtick I committed to memory -- almost -- is when "Gloves"/Bogie's dresser "Saratoga" (Sam McDaniel) is kneeling down fiddling with his seated boss's shoes and Bogie notices something familar about the clothes his servant is wearing. Just the gist of the lines:


Gloves: "Saratoga, is that my tie you're wearing?"

Saratoga: "Yes, boss."

Gloves: (Looking him up at down) "And my shirt?"

Saratoga: "Yes, boss."

Gloves: (Still scrutinizing him) "And what about that belt?"

Saratoga: "I didn't think you'd want me to let your pants fall down."

Gloves: "I'll talk to you later."

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