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Lucille LaVerne and Disney's Wicked Queen


Lucille LaVerne, who plays La Vengence in this film (Mme DeFarge's fellow Knitting woman), was signed by Walt Disney to voice the Wicked Queen/Wicked Witch in SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS after he saw this film. The animators even made the witch resemble Miss LaVerne (without her teeth). When it came time to voice the characters, she did beautifully as the Queen, but had some problems with the Witch, until she took out her false teeth...then the voice was perfect.

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[deleted]

She played Edward G. Robinson's blackmailing landlady in "Little Caesar" and James Cagney's mother in "Sinner's Holiday", which I believe was his first movie.
Did a more evil-appearing hag ever grace the screen?

cinefreak

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Did you ever notice the moustache she has in ORPHANS OF THE STORM? What more could make her creepier or nastier? I've shown ORPHANS to my drama students, and the moustache is all they can comment on!

Spin

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The mustache is pretty memorable!
Lucille Laverne was evidently a highly respected legitimate actress with her own theatrical troup for some time.
My wife and I have had a running Lucille LaVerne related gag for many years now. You know the scene in "Tale" where the revolutionairies are sitting in DeFarge's wine shop and Gaspard (Fritz Lieber) leaves to kill the Marquis St. Evremonde? He says, "I go!" Lucille says, "He goes!" and gives that insane cackle. Pretty much anytime one of us leaves the apartment without the other we do the same bit. We've had to modify the cackle over the years, however, for the sake of our larynxes.

cinefreak

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Thank you for sharing your departure routine with us! I love knowing this. It is these little things that everyone does that are so human and delightful!

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This comment comes many years later but I also enjoyed hearing about your ritual. I hope you still do it even occasionally. Those are the things that make a film or actor great in my opinion. I was blessed or cursed with a very similar cackle and I love using it as much as my husband likes hearing me do it. Thanks Lucille.

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When I first saw the film as a child, her hideous ugliness and horrifying cackle (I like to call Lucille LaVerne "the great cackler") gave me nightmares for weeks.

Despite the smallness of the role, she's always made a greater impression on me than Blanche Yurka as Madame DeFarge.



Mice work in mysterious ways.
No, dear. That's God.

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