What Happens to Miss Pross?


In the original, with Edna Mae Oliver, you never find out what becomes of Miss Pross after she saves her "lady-bird" and kills Madame Defarge. That's her last scene. You never find out whether she escapes from France. Is that because it was never included in the movie at all, ended up as a scene on the cutting room floor, or cut from the television version I saw?

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To add to that, in the book, Jerry said that in his opinion, Miss Pross would never hear anything again (the gun blast deafened her), and the book's Voice/Speaker (Charles Darnay) continued with, "indeed she never did", which directly implied that he knew her hearing never returned because she remained with the family and they discovered that her hearing never returned. And they obviously loved her and would never let her go.

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What Happens to Miss Pross?

In the book she looses her hearing as a result of the gun going off so near her ears.
It also turns out that Barsad is her long-lost brother Solomon.
As to the movie I don't remember whether the border guard mentions her name when he's going through the passports. There's no reason to believe she didn't just stumble downstairs to the wating coach and climb on board.

cinefreak

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The border guard doesn't read her passport because she isn't in that coach. Remember, Mr. Lorry took Dr. Manette, Lucie, little Lucie, and "Sydney Carton" (a drugged Charles Darney) in one coach. Miss Pross and and Jerry Cruncher were to follow in a second coach with all the luggage. So, when Mr. Lorry's coach is passing the border, Miss Pross and Jerry are not aboard.

As another poster has stated, Miss Pross does return to England safely -- although deaf from the pistol blast -- and continues as part of the family. Dickens does show her meeting up with Jerry Cruncher and heading towards the coast. The movie does not. Keep in ming the revolutionaries were after aristocrats and those who supported them. Servants/employees like Miss Pross and Jerry would be left alone. The movie implies that this is so and that the two of them escape back to England.

Spin

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Miss Pross and and Jerry Cruncher were to follow in a second coach with all the luggage. So, when Mr. Lorry's coach is passing the border, Miss Pross and Jerry are not aboard.

Right! It's been many years since I read the book. The two coach solution makes sense. Is that mentioned in the movie?

cinefreak

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Yes, it is. In the courtyard in front of the house there are two coaches. It has been a while since I've watched the movie, but I believe Mr. Lorry tells Jerry to follow them as soon as they can. He leaves with his coach, carrying the family. Jerry and Miss Pross are in the courtyard loading the luggage. Miss Pross remembers that she forgot one of the bags in the house and goes to get it. Madame Defarge is shown entering the courtyard and seeing Jerry load the baggage onto the coach. She knows at once that the family is escaping. While his back is turned, she enters the house to make sure, and encounters Miss Pross.

Although the plan is not discussed in the movie, it does show that there were two carriages -- one with the family and one with the servants and luggage.

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It only makes sense. Otherwise that would be one crowded carriage!

cinefreak

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The book differs from the movie in that the second carriage, which holds Jerry Cruncher & Miss Pross, DOES NOT carry the luggage.

The servant carriage is configured to be much lighter than the main carriage so that it will overtake it on the road and get to the rest stops ahead of it. This will allow the servants to pre-order fresh horses for the main carriage and thus expedite its return to England.

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I'm sorry, you are right. Mr. Lorry takes the family and the luggage with him in one carriage. Miss Pross and Jerry are to follow later in another. Without the weight of baggage, the two should be able to overtake the others. The reason that two carriages were used was because one overburdoned carriage leaving from the house might provoke suspicion that they were escaping.

The movie reverses this. Lorry, et al, leave first without the luggage. Miss Pross and Jerry are to follow.

I feel really stupid. I was trying answer a question, and I ended up confusing the novel and movie myself.

Mea Culpa
Spin

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I watched TOTC partially yesternite on TCM and Mr. Lorry actually is willing to abandon his bachelordom for her but she repulses his advances.

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Also,what did Carton use to subdue Darnay in his cell?Couldn't have been ether or chloroform??????????

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That is a good question, and one that I have always wondered about. In the film, Carton shakes something from a bottle onto a rag and uses it like ether or chloroform on Darnay. Neither of these were in use yet. In the novel, Dickens writes that Carton visits an apothecary/chemist/druggist and buys two liquids. The apothecary advises Carton not to mix the two. This suggests that when mixed the two substances form a drug that can render a person unconscious. Are there two such drugs? Or did Dickens create something out of his imagination to use in the novel? I think I must find an answer.

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Why did she kill Madame Defarge? Was she the woman who was always knitting?

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