The shoe box lunches


Does anyone know if that type of event really happened in 1906? Kind of like a modern day key swap but more innocent.

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"Box suppers" or "box lunches" were common social events in the late 19th, early 20th century. Churches and other charitable organizations often used them to raise funds, as men would bid on the boxes prepared by various women. The ladies known as the best cooks, naturally drew the highest bids with their wares, all of which led to a lot of (hopefully) good natured competetion. At least this is how it was conducted in the Southwest, where lived my family members whom I have heard reminisce about such when I was a kid long, long ago.

He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good... St. Matthew 5:45

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Shoe boxes seemed to be handy lunch boxes at that time.
I have read a couple of stories set circa 1900, and they mentioned characters taking a train somewhere, and taking their lunch in a shoe box.
In regard to the OP: I had to laugh at the comparison of the scene in the film to today's key swap. Kids then would probably faint (female AND male) if someone told them the meaning of that phrase.

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In "Oklahoma!" there is a lunchbox auction to raise funds for the "school raising" and the picnic boxes are supposed to be unidentifiable, as well. Of course, Aunt Eller mentions, if you know that your girl put this kind of a bow on hers, that's just fine, too.

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Yeah, even in the Archie comics there were stories about that.

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People sometimes decorate shoe boxes in todays world for Christmas and give presents in them. A few of my friends have done that.

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