MovieChat Forums > CavalcadeĀ (1933) Discussion > Age / chronology goof: Fanny Bridges

Age / chronology goof: Fanny Bridges


The story begins as 1899 rolls into 1900 and Fanny hasn't even yet been conceived, much less born. And yet, by 1914 Fanny is an accomplished night club singer and dancer. Fanny is shown as a little girl in the 1909 sequence and looks to be no older than 8, making her age during the outbreak of WWI 14 at the very oldest. Wonder why writer Noel Coward's math was so far off?

Okay folks, show's over, nothing to see here!

reply

[deleted]

Yes, Fanny has been born by the time the movie starts. Her mom (Ellen?) is worried about something happening to Alf, and then what becomes of her and the baby.

But I was also doing the math and thinking, "A 15-year-old singing and dancing in a nightclub?" During the pageant at the beach, sure, but a nightclub? That didn't make much sense.

reply

Thanks for the correction. I was probably Facebooking too much over my phone during early scenes and missed the part which would have shown / referred to the infant Fanny. That being said:

For crying out loud! Even at 15, she's a nightclub star? Why isn't she at home and why isn't she still a schoolgirl? And here's the doozy that is screaming and crying to be asked: WTH is a 20-something year old man doing, consorting with a fifteen year old girl?

But the questions and answers are rendered moot if we can accept the likelihood that either Noel Coward or the screenwriter didn't get his ducks in a row as to what age Fanny is supposed to be. In any case, it's no little girl actress who's portraying the nightclub singer / dancer; Ursula Jeans was 26 years of age during production time.


Okay folks, show's over, nothing to see here!

reply

15 wasn't that young for a girl at that time.
Cannot look old stories through modern eyes.

reply

15 wasn't that young for a girl at that time.

I kinda think, Yes, it WAS too young:

(1.) British child labor laws in effect during the last decades of the 19th Century and in the early 20th Century would have prohibited minors from working at bars and night clubs.

(2.) Working class females might consort with / marry adult men, but by the 20th Century surely no British aristocratic male over 18 would be caught dead robbing a cradle from among the lower classes.

Okay folks, show's over, nothing to see here!

reply