Blonde Crazy Ending


I didn't understand the ending of this movie. Why did Ray Milland double-cross Cagney? Cagney wasn't caught with the negotiable bonds to cover for Milland so why did Milland do it?

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It's been a little while since I saw it and you're right about Cagney not having the bonds on him, but as near as I can figure Milland's character Joe did it so the cops and his bosses would assume anything missing from the safe had been stolen. Plus, I think maybe Milland was jealous of Cagney and Blondell's past relationship. (Joe was certainly a first-class jerk.) Or maybe you just pointed out a major plot hole! LOL Either way, it was a really fun film. I got a kick out of the way Cagney would call Blondell "Hon-eey!"


Morse's Law: There's always time for one more pint.

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I definitely don't think it was a plot-hole, if only because Bert asks "Why would Joe double-cross me?". I think it was because Joe probably knew Ann always loved Bert and wanted to be rid of him.

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hi, anyone know when this dvd will be released?? just getting into Blondell and i already am a big Cagney fan! thanks

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I don't think Joe stole anything. I think the whole thing was a ruse to get Bert out of the way. Joe lied to Anne about it, knowing it was Bert she really loved.

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That thought crossed my mind as well. It wouldn't make sense any other way. If he really had taken the negotiable bonds then he still would be in trouble, because the police would see that Bert didn't have them.

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It had to be jealousy. If Joe had embezzled anything, the best thing for him was for Bert to take the bonds, make it look like a burglary, and not get caught. With Bert caught, though, Ann is bound to know it's a double-cross and it just makes her feelings for Bert clearer which is exactly what happens. So, on top of being a jerk, Joe was not very bright.

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Although Joe might have been somewhat jealous of the relationship between Bert and Anne, I think he felt that framing Bert was his best way to hide his crime. He knew he would be under suspicion for the break-in, even if he had an alibi. After all, he might be in cahoots with the burglar, especially since there were no signs of forcible entry (because Joe gave Bert the key and combination).

From the standpoint of the film's theme, it also paints Joe in stark contrast to Bert, who has his own code of ethics. And that makes it easy for Anne to choose Bert over Joe.

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Maybe because that he couldn't explain how the safe's key and combination were in someone elses possession? (Although, shouldn't Bert have considered of this too?)

For Joe, it was much more credible story to the police that Burt came to him and obtained the key/combination by force from him.

He reports it and if there's a shortfall, it was lost in the chase.

No one will believe Burt because he's a conman.

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