A bit of perspective


During this battle, which began on July 1, 1916, 20,000 British troops were killed and 40,000 wounded on the first day alone! They were slaughtered by German machine guns and artillery as they marched forward, in most cases, without having even reached the German trenches. Over the next several days, many of the wounded died agonizing drawn out deaths where they lay. By month's end the English and French had lost 200,000 men and the Germans 160,000, whereas the front had barely shifted 3 miles. At the time the offensive ended on November 19, both sides had lost a total of 600,000 men.

How does one comprehend losses of this magnitude?

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It was 19th century offensive tactics against 20th century machine guns. The resulting carnage was inevitable.

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Tactics aren't much help against firepower.

Marlon, Claudia and Dimby the cats 1989-2005, 2007 and 2010.

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In the sense that by the end of 1918 the British had developed more effective tactics, using tanks and ground-attack aircraft for example, Manco82 is right.

But Squeeth2 is wrong, I think, an example being how the massive technological strength of the USA could not defeat the Viet Cong.

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