63 Up


63 Up

Anyone here familiar with the 7 Up and subsequent documentaries?

This was a UK documentary series started in 1964 by director Michael Apted.

The concept was that he would film a group of children in the UK aged 7, from varying backgrounds and different parts of the UK. Some from wealthy homes, some poor, some middle class, some from the North, some from the South etc. He basically interviewed them on various subjects, and questioned them on what they wanted to do when they got older.

Then he would revisit them every 7 years and make a fresh documentary. Which he actually did. It's a fascinating experiment, and a compelling watch. I actually watched it from the very first episode. 

The changes that the group go through are fascinating...sometimes sad, sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes tragic. But there are also surprises in the different turns some of the groups lives take. 

I just recieved the latest episode on blu ray...63 Up. Hard to believe the series is still going and the participants are still here (apart, sadly, for one). And more importantly that they are still willing to share their experiences and participate. 

One of the most fascinating social TV experiments ever, and an incredible achievement. I highly recommend watching these if you get the chance. They are utterly fascinating.

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It DOES sound interesting but quite a lot like real life which is mostly just work and bills...I'd watch it if there are zombies, karate fights or even a car chase
Tell me karate zombies get in a car chase and I'm sold👍

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theres a lotta reality shows built on less.
Like that one where we watch people who are watching TV. you get that one in the US?

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I don't think we have that but I think The UK does

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I would find this depressing

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I hadn't heard of this. I agree that it is a fascinating project and a very impressive accomplishment to keep it going for so many years.

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I've been following it since, I think, 27-Up was probably the first one I watched at original air date.

These are compelling documentaries but I also find them exceedingly depressing. Particularly the trajectory of Neil. He seemed to have such spark and promise as a cheerful little boy, but then became this deeply troubled person who struggled in life and even became homeless. My heart breaks for that and you wonder what the f happens to a person. I kind of relate to him.

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I marathoned the then-existing episodes between 7 and 49, back around 2010 and found it a very interesting experience. However, as with real people, there isn't enough happening in their later life (apart from death) that makes the show interesting anymore.

With 56up and 63up, it's like the show is now in a holding pattern until each of the participants finally dies. Depressingly similar to real life in this regard, I imagine.

I'd genuinely recommend the uninitiated to not bother watching this series until about 20 years from now when all the participants have died. Only then I feel will it have it's maximum impact as a documentary.

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Absolutely the most interesting documentary of all time. I have watched all but the last, 63. Thanks for the heads up. When you see that 7 year old turn into a crazy person, no spoilers on who, it is so strange. I saw them as they were released, but if you watch them for the first time back to back, that would blow your mind.

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Where did you find/watch 63 up? Netflix, amazon?

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It was released this week on blubray and dvd in the UK

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I've seen them all. I LOVE it, and love any documentaries like this. If anyone has recommendations, I will watch them!

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